Keeping in Touch

While we are in shutdown due to the COVID-19 we thought it would be a good idea to have a place on our website where we could, on a regular basis,  keep you informed, provide fun things to do, excite your mind, provide links to interesting places, inject some humour,  share some ideas and generally brighten up your day. So, on a regular basis while we are all sitting at home, our webmaster, Ian Handricks, will update this page for you and he would welcome your input, ideas and anything else you might like to share on the page and he will do his best to include your ideas in the next post. Ian can be contacted on ianhandricks@gmail.com Click on buttons below to go to a specific day or scroll down for a journey through the days

n.b. When viewing the videos use these controls ... click on           in bottom left of video to start video and

 

                                                                                              click on           in bottom right of video to expand to full screen

Day 30
 
To Coin a Phrase
I delivered 10 pun-laden one-liners hoping for a laugh ... but no pun in ten did!

Shakespeare's Words

Shakespeare invented more than 1700 words! When he invented words, he did it by working with existing words and altering them in new ways. More specifically, he would create new words by:

  • Conjoining two words

  • Changing verbs into adjectives

  • Changing nouns into verbs

  • Adding prefixes to words

  • Adding suffixes to words

In Shakespeare’s collected writings, he used a total of 31,534 different words. Here are some of them:

  • academe

  • accessible

  • accommodation

  • addiction

  • admirable

  • aerial

  • airless

  • amazement

  • anchovy

  • arch-villain

  • auspicious

  • bacheolorship

  • barefaced

  • baseless

  • batty

  • beachy

  • bedroom

  • belongings

  • birthplace

  • black-faced

  • bloodstained

  • bloodsucking

  • blusterer

  • bodikins

  • braggartism

  • brisky

  • broomstaff

  • budger

  • bump

  • buzzer

  • candle holder

  • catlike

  • characterless

  • cheap

  • chimney-top

  • chopped

  • churchlike

  • circumstantial

  • clangor

  • cold-blooded

  • coldhearted

  • compact

  • consanguineous

  • control

  • coppernose

  • countless

  • courtship

  • critical

  • cruelhearted

  • Dalmatian

  • dauntless

  • dawn

  • day’s work

  • deaths-head

  • defeat

  • depositary

  • dewdrop

  • dexterously

  • disgraceful

  • distasteful

  • distrustful

  • dog-weary

  • domineering

  • downstairs

  • dwindle

  • East Indies

  • embrace

  • employer

  • employment

  • enfranchisement

  • engagement

  • enrapt

  • epileptic

  • equivocal

  • eventful

  • excitement

  • expedience

  • expertness

  • exposure

  • eyedrop

  • eyewink

  • fair-faced

  • fairyland

  • fanged

  • fat-witted

  • fathomless

  • featureless

  • fiendlike

  • fitful

  • fixture

  • fleshment

  • flirt-gill

  • flowery

  • fly-bitten

  • footfall

  • foppish

  • foregone

  • fortune-teller

  • foul mouthed

  • Franciscan

  • freezing

  • fretful

  • full-grown

  • fullhearted

  • futurity

  • gallantry

  • garden house

  • generous

  • gentlefolk

  • glow

  • go-between

  • grass plot

  • gravel-blind

  • gray-eyed

  • green-eyed

  • grief-shot

  • grime

  • gust

  • half-blooded

  • heartsore

  • hedge-pig

  • hell-born

  • hint

  • hobnail

  • homely

  • honey-tongued

  • hornbook

  • hostile

  • hot-blooded

  • howl

  • hunchbacked

  • hurly

  • idle-headed

  • ill-tempered

  • ill-used

  • impartial

  • imploratory

  • import

  • in question

  • inauspicious

  • indirection

  • indistinguishable

  • inducement

  • informal

  • inventorially

  • investment

  • invitation

  • invulnerable

  • jaded

  • juiced

  • keech

  • kickie-wickie

  • kitchen-wench

  • lackluster

  • ladybird

  • lament

  • land-rat

  • laughable

  • leaky

  • leapfrog

  • lewdster

  • loggerhead

  • lonely

  • long-legged

  • love letter

  • lustihood

  • lustrous

  • madcap

  • militarist

  • mimic

  • misgiving

  • misquote

  • mockable

  • money’s worth

  • monumental

  • moonbeam

  • mortifying

  • motionless

  • mountaineer

  • multitudinous

  • neglect

  • never-ending

  • newsmonger

  • nimble-footed

  • noiseless

  • nook-shotten

  • obscene

  • ode

  • offenseful

  • offenseless

  • Olympian

  • on purpose

  • oppugnancy

  • outbreak

  • overblown

  • overcredulous

  • overgrowth

  • overview

  • pageantry

  • pale-faced

  • passado

  • paternal

  • pebbled

  • pedant

  • pedantical

  • pendulous

  • pignut

  • pious

  • please-man

  • plumpy

  • posture

  • prayerbook

  • priceless

  • profitless

  • Promethean

  • protester

  • published

  • puking (disputed)

  • puppy-dog

  • pushpin

  • quarrelsome

  • radiance

  • rascally

  • rawboned

  • reclusive

  • refractory

  • reinforcement

  • reliance

  • remorseless

  • reprieve

  • resolve

  • restoration

  • restraint

  • retirement

  • revokement

  • revolting

  • ring carrier

  • roadway

  • roguery

  • rose-cheeked

  • rose-lipped

  • rumination

  • ruttish

  • sanctimonious

  • satisfying

  • savage

  • savagery

  • schoolboy

  • scrimer

  • scrubbed

  • scuffle

  • seamy

  • skim milk

  • skimble-skamble

  • slugabed

  • soft-hearted

  • spectacled

  • spilth

  • spleenful

  • sportive

  • stealthy

  • stillborn

  • successful

  • suffocating

  • tanling

  • tardiness

  • time-honored

  • title page

  • to arouse

  • to barber

  • to bedabble

  • to belly

  • to besmirch

  • to bet

  • to bethump

  • to blanket

  • to cake

  • to canopy

  • to castigate

  • to cater

  • to champion

  • to comply

  • to compromise

  • to cow

  • to cudgel

  • to dapple

  • to denote

  • to dishearten

  • to dislocate

  • to educate

  • to elbow

  • to enmesh

  • to enthrone

  • to fishify

  • to glutton

  • to gnarl

  • to gossip

  • to grovel

  • to happy

  • to hinge

  • to humor

  • to impede

  • to inhearse

  • to inlay

  • to instate

  • to lapse

  • to muddy

  • to negotiate

  • to numb

  • to offcap

  • to operate

  • to out-Herod

  • to out-talk

  • to out-villain

  • to outdare

  • to outfrown

  • to outscold

  • to outsell

  • to outweigh

  • to overpay

  • to overpower

  • to overrate

  • to palate

  • to pander

  • to perplex

  • to petition

  • to rant

  • to reverb

  • to reword

  • to rival

  • to sate

  • to secure

  • to sire

  • to sneak

  • to squabble

  • to subcontract

  • to uncurl

  • to undervalue

  • to undress

  • to unfool

  • to unhappy

  • to unsex

  • to widen

  • tortive

  • traditional

  • tranquil

  • transcendence

  • trippingly

  • unaccommodated

  • unappeased

  • unchanging

  • unclaimed

  • unearthy

  • uneducated

  • unfrequented

  • ungoverned

  • ungrown

  • unhelpful

  • unhidden

  • unlicensed

  • unmitigated

  • unmusical

  • unpolluted

  • unpublished

  • unquestionable

  • unquestioned

  • unreal

  • unrivaled

  • unscarred

  • unscratched

  • unsolicited

  • unsolicited

  • unsullied

  • unswayed

  • untutored

  • unvarnished

  • unvarnished

  • unwillingness

  • upstairs

  • useful

  • useless

  • valueless

  • varied

  • varletry

  • vasty

  • vulnerable

  • watchdog

  • water drop

  • water fly

  • well-behaved

  • well-bred

  • well-educated

  • well-read

  • wittolly

  • worn out

  • wry-necked

  • yelping

  • zany

  • to sully

  • to supervise

  • to swagger

  • to torture

  • to un muzzle

  • to unbosom

  • self-abuse

  • shipwrecked

  • shooting star

  • shudder

  • silk stocking

  • silliness

  • madwoman

  • majestic

  • malignancy

  • manager

  • marketable

  • marriage bed

  • fap

  • far-off

  • farmhouse

  • fashionable

Shakespeare Humour

Why did William Shakespeare only write in quill?

Because pencils confused him - 2B or not 2B

A Person walks into a bookstore and says "Can I have a book by Shakespeare?" The bookkeeper replies, "Of Course sir, which one?" ... William.

 

Why did Shakespeare enjoy high school?

He didn't have to learn Shakespeare

Pull the other one!

Shakespeare Trivia

  • Shakespeare’s parents were John and Mary Shakespeare (nee Arden). John came to Stratford from Snitterfield before 1532 as an apprentice glover and tanner of leathers. He prospered and began to deal in farm products and wool before being elected to a multitude of civic positions.

  • Shakespeare had seven siblings: Joan (b 1558, only lived 2 months); Margaret (b 1562); Gilbert (b 1566); another Joan (b 1569); Anne (b 1571); Richard (b 1574) and Edmund (b 1580). One of Shakespeare’s relatives on his mother’s side, William Arden, was arrested for plotting against Queen Elizabeth I, imprisoned in the Tower of London and executed.

  • Shakespeare married his wife Anne Hathaway when he was 18. She was 26 and three months pregnant with Shakespeare’s child when they married. Their first child Susanna was born six months after the wedding. Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway had three children together – a son, Hamnet, who died in 1596, and two daughters, Susanna and Judith. His only granddaughter Elizabeth – daughter of Susanna – died childless in 1670. Shakespeare therefore has no descendants.

  • There are more than 80 variations recorded for the spelling of Shakespeare’s name. In the few original signatures that have survived, Shakespeare spelt his name “Willm Shaksp,” “William Shakespe,” “Wm Shakspe,” “William Shakspere,” ”Willm Shakspere,” and “William Shakspeare”. There are no records of him ever having spelt it “William Shakespeare”.

  • Few people realise that apart from writing his numerous plays and sonnets, Shakespeare was also an actor who performed many of his own plays as well as those of other playwrights. There is evidence that he played the ghost in Hamlet and Adam in As You Like It. During his life Shakespeare performed before Queen Elizabeth I and, later, before James I who was an enthusiastic patron of his work.

  • Shakespeare lived a double life. By the seventeenth century he had become a famous playwright in London but in his hometown of Stratford, where his wife and children were, and which he visited frequently, he was a well-known and highly respected businessman and property owner.

  • It’s likely that Shakespeare wore a gold hoop earring in his left ear – a creative, bohemian look in the Elizabethan & Jacobean eras. This style is evidenced in the Chandos portrait, one of the most famous depictions of Shakespeare.

  • During his lifetime Shakespeare became a very wealthy man with a large property portfolio. He was a brilliant businessman – forming a joint-stock company with his actors meaning he took a share in the company’s profits, as well as earning a fee for each play he wrote.

  • Shakespeare’s family home in Stratford was called New Place. The house stood on the corner of Chapel Street and Chapel Lane, and was apparently the second largest house in the town. Sometime after his unsuccessful application to become a gentleman, Shakespeare took his father to the College of Arms to secure their own Shakespeare family crest. The crest was a yellow spear on a yellow shield, with the Latin inscription “Non Sans Droict”, or “Not without Right”.

  • On his death Shakespeare made several gifts to various people but left his property to his daughter, Susanna. The only mention of his wife in Shakespeare’s own will is: “I gyve unto my wief my second best bed with the furniture”. The “furniture” was the bedclothes for the bed. Shakespeare’s burial at Holy Trinity Church in Stratford Upon Avon is documented as happening on 25th April 1616. In keeping with traditions of the time it’s likely he would have been buried two days after his death, meaning Shakespeare likely died 23rd April 1616 – his 52nd birthday.

  • Shakespeare penned a curse for his grave, daring anyone to move his body from that final resting place. His epitaph was:

Good friend for Jesus’ sake forbear,

To dig the dust enclosed here:

Blest be the man that spares these stones,

And curst be he that moves my bones.

 

  • Though it was customary to dig up the bones from previous graves to make room for others, the remains in Shakespeare’s grave are still undisturbed. Shakespeare’s original grave marker showed him holding a bag of grain. Citizens of Stratford replaced the bag with a quill in 1747.

  • Although Catholicism was effectively illegal in Shakespeare’s lifetime, the Anglican Archdeacon, Richard Davies of Lichfield, who had known him wrote some time after Shakespeare’s death that he had been a Catholic.

  • During his life, Shakespeare wrote at least 37 plays, 154 sonnets and a number of poems! that we know of. In addition, there are a number of “lost plays” and plays that Shakespeare collaborated on. This means Shakespeare wrote an average 1.5 plays a year since he first started writing in 1589.

  • Shakespeare is most often referred to as an Elizabethan playwright, but as most of his most popular plays were written after Elizabeth’s death he was actually more of a Jacobean writer. His later plays also show the distinct characteristics of Jacobean drama.

  • Shakespeare has been credited by the Oxford English Dictionary with introducing almost 3,000 words to the English language. Estimations of his vocabulary range from 17,000 to a dizzying 29,000 words – at least double the number of words used by the average conversationalist. According to Shakespeare professor Louis Marder, “Shakespeare was so facile in employing words that he was able to use over 7,000 of them – more than occur in the whole King James Version of the Bible – only once and never again.”

  • In Elizabethan theatre circles it was common for writers to collaborate on writing plays. Towards the end of his career Shakespeare worked with other writers on plays that have been credited to those writers. Other writers also worked on plays that are credited to Shakespeare. We know for certain that Timon of Athens was a collaboration with Thomas Middleton; Pericles with George Wilkins; and The Two Noble Kinsmen with John Fletcher.

  • Shakespeare’s last play – The Two Noble Kinsmen – is reckoned to have been written in 1613 when he was 49 years old.

  • The Comedy of Errors is Shakespeare’s shortest play at just 1,770 lines long.

  • Some scholars have maintained that Shakespeare did not write the plays attributed to him, with at least fifty writers having been suggested as the “real” author. However, the evidence for Shakespeare’s having written the plays is very strong.

  • Although Shakespeare is almost universally considered as one of the finest writers in the English language, his contemporaries were not always as impressed. The first recorded reference to Shakespeare, written by theatre critic Robert Greene in 1592, was as an “upstart crow, beautified with our feathers”.

  • Suicide occurs an unlucky thirteen times in Shakespeare’s plays, with three suicides occurring in both Antony & Cleopatra and Julius Caesar, and two suicides in Romeo and Juliet.

  • There are only two Shakespeare plays written entirely in verse: they are Richard II and King John. Many of the plays have half of the text in prose.

  • It’s certain that Shakespeare wrote at least two plays that have been lost – titled Cardenio, and Love’s Labour’s Won. It’s likely that Shakespeare wrote many more plays that have been lost.

  • Shakespeare’s shortest play, The Comedy of Errors is only a third of the length of his longest, Hamlet, which takes four hours to perform.

  • Two of Shakespeare’s plays, Hamlet and Much Ado About Nothing, have been translated into Klingon. The Klingon Language Institute plans to translate more!

  • The National Portrait Gallery in London’s first acquisition in 1856 was the ‘Chandos’ portrait of Shakespeare, attributed to the artist John Taylor. It’s now considered the only representation of the writer that has any real claim to having been painted from life.

  • In the King James Bible the 46th word of Psalm 46 is ‘shake’ and the 46th word from the end of the same Psalm is ‘spear’. Some think this was a hidden birthday message to the Bard, as the King James Bible was published in 1611 – the year of Shakespeare’s 46th birthday.

  • The moons of Uranus were originally named in 1852 after magical spirits from English literature. The International Astronomy Union subsequently developed the convention to name all further moons of Uranus (of which there are 27) after characters in Shakespeare’s plays or Alexander Pope’s the Rape of the Lock.

  • Shakespeare had close connections with King James I. The King made the actors of Shakespeare’s company ‘Grooms of Chamber’, in response to which Shakespeare changed the company’s name from the ‘Lord Chamberlain’s Men’ to the ‘King’s Men’. The new title made Shakespeare a favourite with the King and in much demand for Court performances.

  • The Royal Shakespeare Company sells more than half a million tickets a year for Shakespeare productions at their theatres in Stratford-on-Avon, London and Newcastle – introducing an estimated 50,000 people to a live Shakespeare performance for the first time each year.

  • Shakespeare never actually published any of his plays. They are known today only because two of his fellow actors – John Hemminges and Henry Condell – recorded and published 36 of them posthumously under the name ‘The First Folio’, which is the source of all Shakespeare books published.

  • The United States has Shakespeare to thank for its estimated 200 million starlings. In 1890 an American bardolator, Eugene Schiffelin, embarked on a project to import each species of bird mentioned in Shakespeare’s works that was absent from the US. Part of this project involved releasing two flocks of 60 starlings in New York’s Central Park.

  • The American President Abraham Lincoln was a great lover of Shakespeare’s plays and frequently recited from them to his friends. His assassin, John Wilkes Booth was a famous Shakespearean actor.

  • Candles were very expensive in Shakespeare’s time so they were used only for emergencies, for a short time. Most writers wrote in the daytime and socialised in the evenings. There is no reason to think that Shakespeare was any different from his contemporaries.

  • Rumour has it that poet John Keats was so influenced by Shakespeare that he kept a bust of the Bard beside him while he wrote, hoping that Shakespeare would spark his creativity.

  • It was illegal for women and girls to perform in the theatre in Shakespeare’s lifetime so all the female parts were written for boys. The text of some plays like Hamlet and Antony and Cleopatra refer to that. It was only much later, during the Restoration, that the first woman appeared on the English stage.

  • Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre came to a premature end on 29th June 1613 after a cannon shot set fire to the thatched roof during a performance of Henry VIII. Within two hours the theatre was burnt to the ground, to be rebuilt the following year. (See our article on interesting facts on The Globe Theatre.)

  • An outbreak of the plague in Europe resulted in all London theatres being closed between 1592 and 1594. As there was no demand for plays during this time, Shakespeare began to write poetry, completing his first batch of sonnets in 1593, aged 29.

  • According to the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, Shakespeare wrote close to a tenth of the most quoted lines ever written or spoken in English. What’s more, according to the Literature Encyclopaedia, Shakespeare is the second most quoted English writer after the writers of the Bible.

  • Copyright didn’t exist in Shakespeare’s time, as a result of which there was a thriving trade in copied plays. To help counter this, actors got their lines only once the play was in progress – often in the form of cue acting where someone backstage whispered them to the person shortly before he was supposed to deliver them.

  • Shakespeare left Stratford in 1587 and went to London. The first record of William Shakespeare in London is of him living in Bishopsgate in 1596 (see our post on where Shakespeare lived in London). The address is unknown is thought to be in the vicinity of Leadenhall Street and St Mary Avenue.

  • According to the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, Shakespeare wrote close to a tenth of the most quoted lines ever written or spoken in English. What’s more, according to the Literature Encyclopaedia, Shakespeare is the second most quoted English writer after the writers of the Bible.

  • Copyright didn’t exist in Shakespeare’s time, as a result of which there was a thriving trade in copied plays. To help counter this, actors got their lines only once the play was in progress, often in the form of cue acting where someone backstage whispered them to the person shortly before he was supposed to deliver them.

  • Few people realise that aside from writing 37 plays and composing 154 sonnets, Shakespeare was also an established actor who performed in many of his own plays as well as those of his contemporaries, such as Ben Jonson.

  • William Shakespeare would have been considered a very controversial figure when he married a much older woman who was pregnant with their child. Anne Hathaway was 26 years old when William married her at the age of 18. She duly gave birth to Susannah six months after the wedding (read more about Shakespeare’s family).

  • Shakespeare in ‘tlhIngan Hol’ Among the 80 languages Shakespeare’s works have been translated into, the most obscure must be the constructed language of Star Trek’s Klingon. Hamlet and Much Ado about Nothing have both been translated as part of the Klingon Shakespeare Restoration Project by the Klingon Language Institute.

  • The National Portrait Gallery in London’s first acquisition in 1856 was the ‘Chandos’ portrait of Shakespeare, attributed to the artist John Taylor. It’s now considered the only representation of the writer that has any real claim to having been painted from life.

  • There is a curse placed on Shakespeare’s grave in Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon in the form of a poem etched on his tombstone, written by Shakespeare himself. Though this undoubtedly helped his bones to remain untouched since his death, in 1747 Stratford citizens actually replaced the original bag of grain grave marker with a quill.

  • Unlike most artists of his time, Shakespeare died a very wealthy man with a large property portfolio. He was a brilliant businessman – forming a joint-stock company with his actors meaning he took a share in the company’s profits, as well as earning a fee for each play he wrote.

  • Shakespeare had close connections with King James I. The King made the actors of Shakespeare’s company ‘Grooms of Chamber’, in response to which Shakespeare changed the company’s name from the ‘Lord Chamberlain’s Men’ to the ‘King’s Men’. The new title made Shakespeare a favourite with the King and in much demand for Court performances.

  • Sometime after his unsuccessful application to become a gentleman, Shakespeare took his father to the College of Arms to secure their own Shakespeare family crest. The crest was a yellow spear on a yellow shield, with the Latin inscription “Non Sans Droict”, or “Not without Right”.

  • Although Shakespeare is almost universally considered as one of the finest writers in the English language, his contemporaries were not always as impressed. The first recorded reference to Shakespeare, written by theatre critic Robert Greene in 1592, was as an “upstart crow, beautified with our feathers”.

  • Nobody knows Shakespeare’s true birthday. It’s celebrated on April 23rd – three days before his baptism which was recorded on April 26th, 1564. However, as Shakespeare was born under the old Julian calendar, what was April 23rd during Shakespeare’s life would actually be May 3rd according to today’s Gregorian calendar.

  • A play called Cardenio, which was credited to Shakespeare and performed in his lifetime, has been completely lost. Today there is no known record of its story anywhere.

  • The Royal Shakespeare Company sells more than half a million tickets a year for Shakespeare productions at their theatres in Stratford-on-Avon, London and Newcastle – introducing an estimated 50,000 people to a live Shakespeare performance for the first time.

  • Shakespeare never actually published any of his plays. They are known today only because two of his fellow actors – John Hemminges and Henry Condell – recorded and published 36 of them posthumously under the name ‘The First Folio’, which is the source of all Shakespeare books published.

  • An outbreak of the plague in Europe resulted in all London theatres being closed between 1592 and 1594. As there was no demand for plays during this time, Shakespeare began to write poetry, completing his first batch of sonnets in 1593, aged 29.

  • Shakespeare has been credited by the Oxford English Dictionary with introducing almost 3,000 words to the English language. Estimations of his vocabulary range from 17,000 to a dizzying 29,000 words – at least double the number of words used by the average conversationalist.

  • According to Shakespeare professor Louis Marder, “Shakespeare was so facile in employing words that he was able to use over 7,000 of them – more than occur in the whole King James Version of the Bible – only once and never again.”

Amish Life!
Life Saver

Dementia Quiz 

 

  1. You are a participant in a race. you overtake the second person. what position are you in?

  2. If you overtake the last person, then what position are you in?

  3. This must be done in your head  only - do  not use paper and pencil or a calculator -  take  1000 and add 40 to it. Now add another 1000 now add 30. Add another 1000. Now add 20 . Now add another 1000. now add 10. what is the total?

  4. Mary's mother has four daughters: Three of them are April, May and June … what is the name of the fourth daughter?

  5. A mute person goes into a shop and wants to buy a toothbrush. by imitating the action of brushing his teeth he successfully expresses himself to the shopkeeper and the purchase is done.  Next, a blind man comes into the shop who wants to buy a pair of sunglasses; how does he indicate what he wants?

 

 

Answers:

  1. if you answered that you are first, then you are absolutely wrong! if you overtake the second person and you take his place, you are  in second place!

  2. If you answered that you are second to last, then you are ... wrong again. tell me sunshine, how can you overtake the last person??

  3. Did you get 5000? The correct answer is actually 4100 ... if   you don't believe it, check it with a calculator!

  4. Her name is  Mary! Read the question again!

  5. It's really very simple he opens his mouth and asks for them!

3D Printed Inter meshed gear wheels!
"I don't feel like doing anything today!"
Day 31
 
Changing Tracks
Boogie on down the line
Changing Places
Up the Eiffel Tower
Washboard Wiggles
The Swamp Shakers - The Hucklebuck
Jörg Hegemann - Boogie Woogie
Jörg Hegemann auf der Mittenwalder-Hütte

Lost For Words

Chick on each of the different books in the bookshelf below to discover links to great reading, books and literary sites - have fun exploring the unknown world of words!

b2.jpg
b11.jpg
b9.jpg
b10.jpg
b8.jpg
b7.jpg
b6.jpg
b5.jpg
b4.jpg
b3.jpg
b1.jpg
Here's some more Curiosity Clicking
A collection of interesting websites worth a visit (click on black button to visit site)

RealRailway

An on-line free railway simulator - take control of one of many trains and drive them along the tracks - enjoyreal scenery

Pl@ntNet

Identify, explore and share your observations of wild plants and fauna. Pl@ntNet is a tool to help to identify plants with pictures.

Streema - Free TV Online

 

Streema offers a large number of on-line and free TV channels 

Day 32
 
A Galaxy of Stars
Watch this space!
5-year old Sophie Fatu
Puttin' on the Ritz in Moscow
Why Gyms Weren't Needed Back in the 50's & 60's
Competitive Foursome

Clever Librarian

Read the titles of the books from top left onwards - a very clever librarian has arranged these books in a simply brilliant way

Here's Astronomical Curiosity Clicking
A collection of interesting websites worth a visit (click on black button to visit site)

100,000 Stars

An on-line free tour of the galaxies where you can zoom down on thousands of stars, universes and planets etc.

NASA

An awesome siye which allows you to take virtual space tours, view mind-blowing videos and keep in touch with what's happening in space

Space

 

Space.com claims to be the world’s No. 1 source for news of astronomy, skywatching, space exploration, commercial spaceflight and related technologies.  It does truly have the latest discoveries, missions, trends and futuristic ideas. 

Heavens Above

Get star charts, information on the Solar System and so much more.  It gives up to date information on the greatest man-made structure in space, the International Space Station.  All you have to do is input your location and it will tell you when the space station will appear.  

NASA Image of the Day

A magnificent library of images from space. Worth a long look - some stunning photography

Solar System Scope

 

Solar System Scope is a model of Solar System, Night sky and Outer Space in real time, with accurate positions of objects and lots of interesting facts.

Space for a few jokes
  • Where would an astronaut park his space ship?                          A parking meteor!

  • What time do astronauts eat?                                                         At launch time.

  • If athletes get athlete's foot, do astronauts get mistletoe?

  • Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon,            Neil A spelled backwards is alien!

  • What do you call an overweight ET?                                               An extra cholesterol

  • What do you think astronauts wear to keep warm?                    Apollo neck jumpers

Day 33
 
Entertaining the Thought
Cerebral Stimuli
Rhapsody in Blue - Emily Bear, age 13
Emily Bear - Bumble Bear Boogie
Johan Blohm - Boogie
Piano-Boogie-Medley, Stefan Ulbricht, Chris Conz

A MESSAGE FROM THE QUEEN  

  • The letter 'U' will be reinstated in words such as 'colour,' 'favour,' 'labour' and 'neighbour.' Likewise, you will learn to spell 'doughnut' without skipping half the letters, and the suffix '-ize' will be replaced by the suffix '-ise.' Generally, you will be expected to raise your vocabulary to acceptable levels. (look up 'vocabulary').  

  • Using the same twenty-seven words interspersed with filler noises such as 'like' and 'you know' is an unacceptable and inefficient form of communication. There is no such thing as U.S. English. We will let Microsoft know on your behalf. The Microsoft spell-checker will be adjusted to take into account the reinstated letter 'u' and the elimination of '-ize.'  

  • July 4th will no longer be celebrated as a holiday.  

  • You will learn to resolve personal issues without using guns, lawyers, or therapists. The fact that you need so many lawyers and therapists shows that you're not quite ready to be independent. Guns should only be used for shooting grouse. If you can't sort things out without suing someone or speaking to a therapist, then you're not ready to shoot grouse.  

  • Therefore, you will no longer be allowed to own or carry anything more dangerous than a vegetable peeler. Although a permit will be required if you wish to carry a vegetable peeler in public.  

  • All intersections will be replaced with roundabouts, and you will start driving on the left side with immediate effect. At the same time, you will go metric with immediate effect and without the benefit of conversion tables. Both roundabouts and metrication will help you understand the British sense of humour.  

  • The former USA will adopt UK prices on petrol (which you have been calling gasoline) of roughly $10/US gallon. Get used to it.  

  • You will learn to make real chips. Those things you call French fries are not real chips, and those things you insist on calling potato chips are properly called crisps. Real chips are thick cut, fried in animal fat, and dressed not with catsup but with vinegar.  

  • The cold, tasteless stuff you insist on calling beer is not actually beer at all. Henceforth, only proper British Bitter will be referred to as beer, and European brews of known and accepted provenance will be referred to as Lager. South African beer is also acceptable, as they are pound for pound the greatest sporting nation on earth and it can only be due to the beer. They are also part of the British Commonwealth - see what it did for them. American brands will be referred to as Near-Frozen Gnat's Urine, so that all can be sold without risk of further confusion.   

  • Hollywood will be required occasionally to cast English actors as good guys. Hollywood will also be required to cast English actors to play English characters. Watching Andie Macdowell attempt English dialect in Four Weddings and a Funeral was an experience akin to having one's ears removed with a cheese grater.  

  • You will cease playing American football. There is only one kind of proper football; you call it soccer. Those of you brave enough will, in time, be allowed to play rugby (which has some similarities to American football, but does not involve stopping for a rest every twenty seconds or wearing full kevlar body armour like a bunch of nancies).  

  • Further, you will stop playing baseball. It is not reasonable to host an event called the World Series for a game which is not played outside of America. Since only 2.1% of you are aware there is a world beyond your borders, your error is understandable. You will learn cricket, and we will let you face the South Africans first to take the sting out of their deliveries.  

  • You must tell us who killed JFK. It's been driving us mad.  

  • An internal revenue agent (i.e. tax collector) from Her Majesty's Government will be with you shortly to ensure the acquisition of all monies due (backdated to 1776).  

  • Daily Tea Time begins promptly at 4 p.m. with proper cups, with saucers, and never mugs, with high quality biscuits (cookies) and cakes; plus strawberries (with cream) when in season.

 

God Save the Queen!

To the citizens of the United States of America from Her Sovereign Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.  

 

"In light of your failure to nominate competent candidates for President of the USA, and thus to govern yourselves, we hereby give notice of the revocation of your independence, effective immediately.

 

Her Sovereign Majesty Queen Elizabeth II will resume monarchical duties over all states, commonwealths, and territories (except North Dakota, and Utah, which she does not fancy).

 

Our new Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, will appoint a Governor for America without the need for further elections. Congress and the Senate will be disbanded. A questionnaire may be circulated next year to determine whether any of you noticed.  To aid in the transition to a British Crown dependency, the following rules are introduced with immediate effect:  

Day 34
 
In The Minds Eye
Playtime at the Zoo
Pets at Play
Somewhat Distracted

Nature's Creativity

These are all real images of phenomena created by nature. Click on any photo to see larger.

Hawaii - Martin Clunes
Dogs, cats & Birds!

Winston Churchill was a famous British politician who was born on November 30th 1874 in Woodstock, England. His early life was spent in Dublin but he returned to England to attend school.

Even though he didn’t excel in school, Churchill enrolled in the Royal Military College. After graduating, he joined the British Cavalry. During his time in the military, he traveled extensively and wrote about his experiences. In 1908, he married Clementine Hozier, and the couple went on to have five children together. It was during this time that Churchill began his illustrious political career.

Winston Churchill Quotes

He became a member of Parliament in 1900, and when Neville Chamberlain resigned in 1940 during the second World War, Churchill took his place as Prime Minister of England. It was thought that his leadership was the reason for the defeat of Hitler. Churchill lost the 1945 election, but regained his position as Prime Minister in 1951.

In January 1965, Churchill died at the age of 90. His speeches during the war conveyed strength and courage to the population of Great Britain in the face of adversity, and with his candor and wit, he gained much favor among the British people.

These dynamic Winston Churchill quotes prove he was a powerful force in the twentieth century and beyond.

  • “The whole history of the world is summed up in the fact that, when nations are strong, they are not always just, and when they wish to be just, they are no longer strong.”

  • “It is no use saying ‘we are doing our best.’ You have got to succeed in doing what is necessary.”

  • “We shape our dwellings, and afterwards our dwellings shape us.”

  • “It has been said that Democracy is the worst form of government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.”

  • “It is a mistake to try to look too far ahead. The chain of destiny can only be grasped one link at a time.”

  • “When I am abroad, I always make it a rule never to criticize or attack the government of my own country. I make up for lost time when I come home.”

  • “I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat.”

  • “Dictators ride to and fro on tigers from which they dare not dismount. And the tigers are getting hungry.”

  • “Employ your time in improving yourself by other men’s writings so that you shall come easily by what others have labored hard for.”

  • “I have never accepted what many people have kindly said, namely that I have inspired the nation. It was the nation and the race dwelling all around the globe that had the lion heart. I had the luck to be called upon to give the roar.”

  • “Without a measureless and perpetual uncertainty, the drama of human life would be destroyed.”

  • “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.”

  • “An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile – hoping it will eat him last.”

  • “Solitary trees, if they grow at all, grow strong.”

  • “Say what you have to say and the first time you come to a sentence with a grammatical ending – sit down.”

  • “Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say: “This was their finest hour.”

  • “Do not let us speak of darker days; let us speak rather of sterner days. These are not dark days: these are great days – the greatest days our country has ever lived. ”

  • “The English know how to make the best of things. Their so-called muddling through is simply skill at dealing with the inevitable.”

  • “War is mainly a catalogue of blunders.”

  • “In war, as in life, it is often necessary, when some cherished scheme has failed, to take up the best alternative open, and if so, it is folly not to work for it with all your might.”

  • “No one can guarantee success in war, but only deserve it.”

  • “If one has to submit, it is wasteful not to do so with the best grace possible.”

  • “All the great things are simple, and many can be expressed in a single word: freedom; justice; honor; duty; mercy; hope.”

  • “We must beware of needless innovations, especially when guided by logic.”

  • “One ought never to turn one’s back on a threatened danger and try to run away from it. If you do that, you will double the danger. But if you meet it promptly and without flinching, you will reduce the danger by half. Never run away from anything. Never!”

  • “Success is never found. Failure is never fatal. Courage is the only thing.”

  • “Victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror, victory however long and hard the hard may be; for without victory there is no survival. ”

  • “We shall draw from the heart of suffering itself the means of inspiration and survival.”

  • “The problems of victory are more agreeable than those of defeat, but they are no less difficult.”

  • “My most brilliant achievement was my ability to be able to persuade my wife to marry me.”

  • “I am prepared to meet my Maker. Whether my Maker is prepared for the ordeal of meeting me is another matter.”

  • “The English never draw a line without blurring it.”

  • “It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quotations.”

  • “There are a terrible lot of lies going about the world, and the worst of it is that half of them are true.”

  • “To build may have to be the slow and laborious task of years. To destroy can be the thoughtless act of a single day.”

  • “The farther backward you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.”

  • “You have enemies? Good. It means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.”

  • “In finance, everything that is agreeable is unsound and everything that is sound is disagreeable.”

  • “If you’re going through hell, keep going.”

  • “There is only one duty, only one safe course, and that is to try to be right and not to fear to do or say what you believe to be right.”

  • “It is a fine thing to be honest, but it is also very important to be right.”

  • “I like pigs. Dogs look up to us. Cats look down on us. Pigs treat us as equals.”

  • “Never hold discussions with the monkey when the organ grinder is in the room.”

  • “Those who can win a war well can rarely make a good peace, and those who could make a good peace would never have won the war.”

  • “It’s not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what’s required.”

  • “Healthy citizens are the greatest asset any country can have.”

  • “We shall not fail or falter. We shall not weaken or tire. Neither the sudden shock of battle nor the long-drawn trials of vigilance and exertion will wear us down. Give us the tools and we will finish the job.”

  • “Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing ever happened.”

  • “It is wonderful what great strides can be made when there is a resolute purpose behind them.”

  • “We shall show mercy, but we shall not ask for it.”

  • “Success is not final, failure is not fatal, it is the courage to continue that counts.”

  • “All the greatest things are simple, and many can be expressed in a single word: freedom; justice; honour; duty; mercy; hope.”

  • “Personally I’m always ready to learn, although I do not always like being taught.”

  • “The first duty of the university is to teach wisdom, not a trade; character, not technicalities. We want a lot of engineers in the modern world, but we do not want a world of engineers.”

  • “The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings; the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries.”

  • “When the eagles are silent, the parrots begin to jabber.”

  • “History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.”

2 Shea Terrace

Takapuna

AUCKLAND

P.O. Box 65-357

Mairangi Bay 0754

Tel: 09 486 2163

email us

  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Pinterest Icon
  • White Instagram Icon

© 2015 SeniorNet North Shore